RELATED BOOKS:
Et Tu, Babe
Language: en
Pages: 176
Authors: Mark Leyner
Categories: Fiction
Type: BOOK - Published: 2011-07-13 - Publisher: Vintage

In this fiendishly original new novel, Mark Leyner is a leather-blazer-wearing, Piranha 793-driving, narcotic-guzzling monster who has potential rivals eliminated by his bionically enhanced bodyguards, has his internal organs tattooed, and eavesdrops on the erotic fantasies of Victoria's Secret models -- which naturally revolve around him. Leyner's jet-propelled roller derby
Tooth Imprints On a Corn Dog
Language: en
Pages: 240
Authors: Mark Leyner
Categories: Fiction
Type: BOOK - Published: 2011-07-20 - Publisher: Vintage

A fiendishly innovative young writer ups the ante on his cult classics Et Tu, Babe and My Cousin, My Gastroenterologist with a book so funny that it ought to be a controlled substance. "With his pumped-up prose and steroidal satire . . . You could call him the Quentin Tarantino
Memorious Discourse
Language: en
Pages: 282
Authors: Christian Moraru
Categories: Literary Criticism
Type: BOOK - Published: 2005 - Publisher: Fairleigh Dickinson Univ Press

While other types of discourse cover up, gloss over, or play down what they have borrowed - and therefore owe - the postmodern eagerly acknowledges its textual and cultural debt. Moreover, it turns this indebtedness into an unexpected source of creativity and originality." "In his wide-ranging discussion of contemporary writers
Edging Into the Future
Language: en
Pages: 278
Authors: Veronica Hollinger, Joan Gordon
Categories: Literary Criticism
Type: BOOK - Published: 2002-04 - Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

"The savvy critical essays in this provocative collection investigate the interface between science fiction and postmodern culture. . . . Highly recommended for readers at all levels."—Choice
The Story of
Language: en
Pages: 264
Authors: Marjorie Worthington
Categories: Literary Criticism
Type: BOOK - Published: 2018-11-01 - Publisher: University of Nebraska Press

Autofiction, or works in which the eponymous author appears as a fictionalized character, represents a significant trend in postwar American literature, when it proliferated to become a kind of postmodern cliché. The Story of “Me” charts the history and development of this genre, analyzing its narratological effects and discussing its