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How the States Got Their Shapes Too
Language: en
Pages: 352
Authors: Mark Stein
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2012-05-29 - Publisher: Smithsonian Institution

Was Roger Williams too pure for the Puritans, and what does that have to do with Rhode Island? Why did Augustine Herman take ten years to complete the map that established Delaware? How did Rocky Mountain rogues help create the state of Colorado? All this and more is explained in
American Panic
Language: en
Pages: 288
Authors: Mark Stein
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2014-05-20 - Publisher: St. Martin's Press

In American Panic , New York Times bestselling author Mark Stein traces the history and consequences of American political panics through the years. Virtually every American, on one level or another, falls victim to the hype, intensity, and propaganda that accompanies political panic, regardless of their own personal affiliations. By
Creating the American West
Language: en
Pages: 320
Authors: Derek R. Everett
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2014-05-27 - Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press

Boundaries—lines imposed on the landscape—shape our lives, dictating everything from which candidates we vote for to what schools our children attend to the communities with which we identify. In Creating the American West, historian Derek R. Everett examines the function of these internal lines in American history generally and in
Cholera in Detroit
Language: en
Pages: 228
Authors: Richard Adler
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2013-07-30 - Publisher: McFarland

During the mid– to late 19th century, Detroit and the American Midwest were the sites of five major cholera epidemics. The first of these, the 1832 outbreak, was of particular significance—an unexpected consequence of the Black Hawk War. In order to suppress the Native American uprising then taking place in
No Dig, No Fly, No Go
Language: en
Pages: 242
Authors: Mark Monmonier
Categories: Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2010-05-15 - Publisher: University of Chicago Press

Some maps help us find our way; others restrict where we go and what we do. These maps control behavior, regulating activities from flying to fishing, prohibiting students from one part of town from being schooled on the other, and banishing certain individuals and industries to the periphery. This restrictive