RELATED BOOKS:
Porphyry's Commentary on Ptolemy's Harmonics
Language: en
Pages:
Authors:
Categories: Philosophy
Type: BOOK - Published: 2015-09-15 - Publisher: Cambridge University Press

Porphyry's Commentary, the only surviving ancient commentary on a technical text, is not merely a study of Ptolemy's Harmonics. It includes virtually free-standing philosophical essays on epistemology, metaphysics, scientific methodology, aspects of the Aristotelian categories and the relations between Aristotle's views and Plato's, and a host of briefer comments on
Porphyry's Commentary on Ptolemy's Harmonics
Language: en
Pages: 592
Authors: Andrew Barker
Categories: Philosophy
Type: BOOK - Published: 2015 - Publisher:

Books about Porphyry's Commentary on Ptolemy's Harmonics
Theophrastus of Eresus: Commentary Volume 9.1
Language: en
Pages: 148
Authors: Massimo Raffa
Categories: Philosophy
Type: BOOK - Published: 2018-03-22 - Publisher: BRILL

Theophrastus of Eresus: Commentary Volume 9.1 concerns the extant ancient testimonies on Theophrastus’ thought on music, which strike the reader as surprisingly original and modern. Music is regarded as something that originates from the soul and comes into existence through the body.
Music and Philosophy in the Roman Empire
Language: en
Pages:
Authors: Francesco Pelosi, Federico M. Petrucci
Categories: Philosophy
Type: BOOK - Published: 2020-12-17 - Publisher: Cambridge University Press

Is music just matter of hearing and producing notes? And is it of interest just to musicians? By exploring different authors and philosophical trends of the Roman Empire, from Philo of Alexandria to Alexander of Aphrodisias, from the rebirth of Platonism with Plutarch to the last Neoplatonists, this book sheds
Proclus: Commentary on Plato's Timaeus: Volume 4, Book 3, Part 2, Proclus on the World Soul
Language: en
Pages:
Authors: Proclus
Categories: Philosophy
Type: BOOK - Published: 2009-12-03 - Publisher: Cambridge University Press

In the present volume Proclus describes the 'creation' of the soul that animates the entire universe. This is not a literal creation, for Proclus argues that Plato means only to convey the eternal dependence of the World Soul upon higher causes. In his exegesis of Plato's text, Proclus addresses a